Ghost Town: Bodie Historic State Park

stormy day at the Bodie Historic State Park

A stormy day at the Bodie Historic State Park which was once a violent and lawless booming California gold mining town in the Wild West. Several phrases were born to describe the essence of Bodie and its inhabitants who flocked there to find the motherlode: “Badman from Bodie” fit the infamous and remote town. It’s said that a little girl found out her family was moving to Bodie and wrote in her diary, “Goodbye God, I’m going to Bodie.” The phrase stuck and became famous. A preacher called Bodie, “A sea of sin, lashed by the tempest of lust and passion.” Photo #1 by Photographersnature.com

Okumaya devam et

Reklamlar

Mystical, Magical & Magnificent Monasteries in Meteora (20 Pics)

Meteora Greece

The caves in Meteora, Greece, had inhabitants for fifty millennia, but due to raids, “hermit monks” moved to the safety of sandstone rock pinnacles in the 9th century and began building monasteries. More monks and nuns came, building more monasteries perched high upon the cliffs. Wikipedia reports, “Access to the monasteries was originally (and deliberately) difficult, requiring either long ladders lashed together or large nets used to haul up both goods and people. This required quite a leap of faith – the ropes were replaced, so the story goes, only ‘when the Lord let them break.'” UNESCO World Heritage says, “The net in which intrepid pilgrims were hoisted up vertically alongside the 1,224 ft. cliff where the Varlaam monastery dominates the valley symbolizes the fragility of a traditional way of life that is threatened with extinction.” Photo #1 by Vaggelis Vlahos

Okumaya devam et

24 Amazing Auroras: Aurora Borealis & Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis Over South Pole Telescope

Aurora Australis blankets the sky overhead of the 10-meter South Pole Telescope at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica. Like its more familiar counterpart, the Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights, the Aurora Australis is caused by the solar wind passing through the upper atmosphere. But the Aurora Australis is much less frequently observed because so few people live in Antarctica during the austral winter. Photo #1 by Keith Vanderlinde, National Science Foundation

Okumaya devam et