Magnificent Monument Valley – 46 Fantastic Photos – Navajo Nation Part 2

The Navajo name for the valley is Tsé Bii' Ndzisgaii (Valley of the Rocks). Monument Valley Power

The Navajo name for the valley is Tsé Bii’ Ndzisgaii (Valley of the Rocks). The photographer called this shot of Monument Valley “Power”. Photo #1 by Wolfgang Staudt

The Mittens, Monument Valley, Utah - Arizona, Down from the Visitor Center at the Navajo Tribal Park

The Mittens, Monument Valley, Utah – Arizona. This photo was taken down from the Visitor Center at the Navajo Tribal Park. The East and West Mitten Buttes look like hands, yet are supposed to signify spiritual beings watching over the land. Photo #2 by Alex E. Proimos

Skyline Monument Valley

“Skyline” Monument Valley. The monuments on this spectacular land were named by the Navajo, others were named by early settlers who used their imagination. One such name is the “Three Sisters” which is supposed to be a formation of Catholic nun facing her two pupils. Photo #3 by Wolfgang Staudt

Totem pole Monument Valley

Totem pole – Monument Valley. A totem pole is usually carved out of wood and used as a marker by Northeastern tribes, but this 450 feet high Totem Pole spire monument is a great example of what erosion did to the butte. Natural forces of wind and water eroded the land for million of years, whittling away at the surface of the plateau to create stunning natural carvings. Also in Monument Valley is “The Yei Bi Chei” meaning Navajo spiritual gods. It located east of the Totem Pole and is a formation of dancers emerging from a Hogan. Photo #4 by Bousure

Once upon a time in Monument Valley

“Once upon a time” in Monument Valley. Sandstone masterpieces tower 400 to 1,000 feet above this great valley. Photo #5 by Dhilung Kirat

View of Monument Valley in Utah, looking south on highway 163 from 13 miles north of the Arizona - Utah State line

View of Monument Valley in Utah, looking south on highway 163 from 13 miles north of the Arizona – Utah State line. Photo #6 by Marc Averette

Navajo Hogan in Monument Valley

Navajo Hogan in Monument Valley. One monument is “The Hub” which symbolizes the hub of a wagon wheel. Navajos see it as a fire place in the center of a gigantic Hogan which is a Navajo home. Photo #7 by Wolfgang Staudt

Under the Stars Camping in Monument Valley

Under the Stars – Camping in Monument Valley. Photo #8 by Bhanu Tadinada

Sunrise at Monument Valley - Navajo Nation

Sunrise at Monument Valley – Navajo Nation. Another of the famous monuments is known as the “Rain God Mesa” which marks the geological center of the park. According to Native Americans, Navajo medicine men prayed and gave thanks to the Rain God, who stored water for the people. Photo #9 by Luca Galuzzi

Thunderstorm in Monument Valley

Thunderstorm in Monument Valley. Photo #10 by lurw

Storm in Monument Valley

Storm in Monument Valley. Photo #11 by Ville Miettinen

Monument Valley, panoramic pic

Monument Valley, panoramic image. The scenic drive is 17 miles. Some of the monuments include Elephant Butt which depicts a gigantic elephant in the southwest desert, and Camel Butte which faces the west. Photo #12 by Dschwen

Ambition Monument Valley

“Ambition” – Monument Valley. Get out of the car and really take in the magnificent monuments. Dance across the desert like no one is watching. Enjoy this beautiful land. Photo #13 by Wolfgang Staudt

Hunt's Mesa in Monument Valley

Hunt’s Mesa in Monument Valley. There are parts of Monument Valley which are only accessible by guided tour, such as Hunts Mesa and Mystery Valley. Photo #14 by Jason Corneveaux

Tree taken in front of The Thumb at Monument Valley

Tree taken in front of The Thumb at Monument Valley. “The Thumb” is a free standing spire which sits apart from Camel Butte. This formation is also said to look like a cowboy boot. Photo #15 by RawheaD Rex

Moonrise Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, UT - AZ

Moonrise Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, UT – AZ. Photo #16 by Jim Dollar

Monument Valley

Monument Valley. Can you imagine riding a horse to roam this magnificent landscape? Photo #17 by MoMaBi

West Mitten at Monument Valley - Navajo National Parks

West Mitten at Monument Valley – Navajo National Parks. Photo #18 by Huebi

East Mitten and Merrick Butte at Monument Valley

East Mitten and Merrick Butte at Monument Valley. Photo #19 by Daniela Borchert

The North Window at Monument Valley

The North Window at Monument Valley. The “North Window” overlooks the northern view of the lower valley. On the left is Elephant Butte. On the right is Cly Butte. Cly, the Navajo name for Left, is named after a well known Navajo medicine man. He is buried at the foot of the formation. Photo #20 by Phioul

Double Rainbow over Monument Valley

Double Rainbow over Monument Valley. Photo #21 by Josep Renalias

Hunt's Mesa Sunrise Panorama

Hunt’s Mesa Sunrise Panorama. Within the beautiful valley, another monument includes Bird Spring which overlooks a vast sand dune. It is at the bottom of the east valley portion called Sand Springs. There, a natural aquifer seeps out where the De Chelly and Navajo sandstone formations meet under the sand dune. Another monument is called “Spearhead Mesa” and is attached to a spire monument that looks like a spear of an arrow. Photo #22 by Jason Corneveaux

Man on horse - Wild West - Monument Valley Arizona - Utah

Wild West Monument Valley, Utah – Arizona – cowboy on his horse. Photo #23 by Luca Galuzzi

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park at sunset

The Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park at sunset. From left to right: Sentinel Mesa, The Mittens, and Merrick Butte. Panorama stitched from 5 portrait format images. Photo #24 by Christian Mehlführer

Artist Point Monument Valley USA

Monument Valley seen from Artist Point, Arizona, USA. “Artist Point” is a place where artists often go to recreate the landscape by painting it on canvas. Photo #25 by Tobi 87

After the rain comes the sun - Mitchell Butte - Monument Valley

After the rain comes the sun – Mitchell Butte – Monument Valley. Merrick Butte and Mitchell Mesa are named after two prospectors who discovered silver inside the park. Photo #26 by Bousure

Navajo Sunset at Monument Valley

Navajo Sunset at Monument Valley. The photographer wrote, “This evening in Monument Valley on the Navajo Reservation on the border of Utah and Arizona at first didn’t seem to promise much in the way of lighting. It was overcast and very windy most of the late afternoon. But, I had a feeling (a hope, more like it) that there would be enough of a break in the clouds to allow the setting sun to illuminate these famous buttes (West Mitten Butte, East Mitten Butte, and Merrick Butte). Well, I found this cool dead tree and set up my composition, and took a few shots. The lighting was very diffuse, but I fired away nonetheless, content to not even process the images I was taking because they weren’t what I wanted. I know, I can be quite a five-year-old when I don’t get my way.
Then, as if hearing my inner complaints, the clouds started to part revealing blue sky, and the mountains on the eastern horizon were kissed by the warm light of the sun. “Please,” I said. Then, at that moment, whatever cloud was blocking the light from these buttes moved, and like beacons they glowed. I shouted and laughed, “Thaaaank You!” as I captured the beauty of it.” Photo #27 by Nathan Van Arsdale

Honeymoon Arch, Mystery Valley, Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Arizona, USA

Honeymoon Arch at Mystery Valley which is part of Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Arizona, USA. Photo #28 by Bernard Gagnon

Storm, rainbow over Monument Valley

Storm, rainbow over Monument Valley. Although much of Monument Valley can be appreciated from the main road, so much more of the landscape is hidden from view behind long straight cliffs – the Mitchell and Wetherill Mesas – east of the road on the Arizona side. You should make a point of visiting The Navajo Tribal Park. You won’t be sorry for the majestic views that you will never forget. Photo #29 by Bousure

Monument Valley, early in the morning

Monument Valley, early in the morning.The highway cuts through the mesas at Monument Pass, but nearby are several dirt roads that go both east and west, and crisscross the red sandy landscape. It offers a much more up close and personal appreciation of the rock formations. This dirt tracks also lead to Navajo residences. Photo #30 by Wolfgang Staudt

Stout Arch, Mystery Valley, Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Arizona, USA

Stout Arch in Mystery Valley, a part of Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Arizona, USA. Photo #31 by Bernard Gagnon

Valley Drive - Monument Valley is located on the southern border of Utah with northern Arizona. The valley lies within the range of the Navajo Nation Reservation

Valley Drive – Monument Valley is located on the southern border of Utah with northern Arizona. The valley lies within the range of the Navajo Nation Reservation. The park has a hiking path called Wildcat Trail. It is 3.2 miles starting south of the visitor center and looping around West Mitten Butte. Photo #32 by Wolfgang Staudt

Anasazi dwelling, Mystery Valley, Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park

Anasazi dwelling at Mystery Valley in Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Arizona, USA. Photo #33 by Bernard Gagnon

Pine Tree Arch, Mystery Valley, Monument Valley

Pine Tree Arch at Mystery Valley within Monument Valley. Photo #34 by Bernard Gagnon

Monument_valley

The isolated crimson mesas and buttes seem to change colors much like the majestic Grand Canyon, depending upon the play of light, clouds and shadows. Monument Valley has been photographed and filmed so many times that it seem almost familiar, even on a first visit. But then you will discover the gorgeous natural colors really are as bright and deep, and seem to change colors like in all the pictures. Photo #35 by Daniela Borchert

Monument Valley, AZ Navajo land

Monument Valley, AZ. The most highly photographed area is, from the visitor center, Lookout Point where there are great views across three of the valley’s most photographed peaks – East and West Mitten Buttes, and Merrick Butte. Photo #36 by Lutz Braum

Riding at Monument Valley - Navajo

Riding at Monument Valley – Navajo. It is highly recommended to do more than see Monument Valley from the highway. Get out and experience this beautiful place to appreciate and commune with nature. Photo #36 by rwarrin

Monument valley during sunrise

Monument valley during sunrise. Photo #38 by Marco Albonetti

Horses running wild and free at Monument Valley

Horses running wild and free at Monument Valley. Photo #39 by rwarrin

Monument Valley National Monument, Arizona [...moments]

Monument Valley National Monument, Arizona. The photographer called this […moments]. Photo #40 by Stefan Mendelsohn

Traffic Jam in Monument Valley

This photo was dubbed “Traffic Jam” in Monument Valley. Photo #41 by Bhanu Tadinada

Monument Valley on Thanksgiving

Monument Valley taken on Thanksgiving. Photo #42 by Carl Fulton

Monument Valley, Mittens

Monument Valley “Mittens.” Photo #43 by Jim Gordon

Weathered sandstone in the Navajo Tribal Park in Monument Valley in the U.S. state of Arizona

Weathered sandstone in the Navajo Tribal Park in Monument Valley in the U.S. state of Arizona. Photo #44 by Finetooth

Sunrise - Navajo Nation - Monument Valley

Sunrise – Navajo Nation – Monument Valley. The Navajo Parks and Recreation have this saying, “May it be beautiful before me. May it be beautiful behind me. May it be beautiful above me. May it be beautiful below me. May I walk in beauty.” Photo #45 by Wolfgang Staudt

Monumental Moon

The photographer called this Monument Moon. “The full moon, finally visible from behind the clouds, shines brightly over Monument Valley on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. This windy night the clouds and moon danced across the sky and the fire burned fast, but the magic was felt for hours!” Photo #46 by Nathan Van Arsdale

24 thoughts on “Magnificent Monument Valley – 46 Fantastic Photos – Navajo Nation Part 2

  1. When my kids were little, I traveled cross-country with them. I’ll never forget how sweet the people were, offering assistance when I would stop with two little kids and a cat. We stopped at Monument Valley and I took turns waltzing them through the breathtakingly beautiful desert, twirling around, loving it, feeling one with nature. It’s a wonderful memory. I hope to go back someday.

  2. Just returned from a trip that included Monument Valley. We got nice pictures, but you got fantastic pictures! It is truly a magnificent American landscape.

  3. I JUST LOVE PICTURES OF THE OLD WEST..WOW..JUST BEATIFUL SCENERY.S WOULD IT BE POSIBLE I COULD USED SOME OF THE OLD WEST PICTURES AS BACK GROUND WALLPAPER..FOR MY COMPUTER..YOURS TRULY..JERRY DUPLESSIS..THANKS..

  4. Geri bildirim: H εντυπωσιακή κοιλάδα των βράχων! | Perierga.gr

  5. I have visited monument valley 3 times & my wife & I were taken on trail through this magnificant
    area by the Navajos as part of a coach tour. All the times we visited the valley were around mid afternoon when the sun is high & it bleaches out the colours. These show monument valley at its best.

  6. Geri bildirim: Monument Valley – 02 | Samuele Silva

  7. Seeing these images was a wonderfull reminder of the area. I served my church mission in New Mexico and was blessed with the oppertunity to serve in Crown Point New Mexico . I made many friends and loved beeing with the Navajo people. I did some volenter work in the Local Elementry School. The only Navajo words I can remember are Yata A( hello) , Yata A Abini (good morning) , and shebit( stomach). I am shure that the spelling of these words are wrong, it has been 17 years since I was there. Thank you for sharing your pictures.

  8. I went to Monument Valley eight years ago with my family, it is an extraordinary place and i would love to take my children one day. The photo’s are beautiful but once you have been there in the flesh nothing compares!!

  9. Awesome photographs. Traveled to Monument Valley a couple of years ago and it’s still on my mind! Did not have a chance to visit the slots, but will this time. Planning on returning this year and staying at The View. The view from the visitors center is worth the entire trip! As made the loop around the valley a feeling of peacefulness and serenity enveloped me. Such a strong connection to the earth. I am inspired by the photographers who posted such beautiful photography. Hope to bring hame a few myself. Thanks

  10. Question: “Under the Stars – Camping in Monument Valley. (Photo #8 by Bhanu Tadinada)”,
    The momunent behind the tent was very close to where the “Lars Jorgensen ranch” in
    the film “The Searchers” with John Wayne (1956).

    Does any one know the name of the specific momunent and/or where that momument is
    in Monument is in the park?

    Thank you!

  11. Geri bildirim: Once upon a time in Monument Valley.. | Infoware 101

  12. Geri bildirim: Magnificent Monument Valley – 46 Fantastic Photos – Navajo Nation Part 2 | chaotiqual

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