46 Fabulous Photos of Endeavour’s Last Ever Spacewalk

27 May 2011 7-hour, 24-minute spacewalk - NASA astronauts Endeavour last spacewalk

May 27th, 2011: the last spacewalk for NASA’s Endeavour astronauts. Here, a fish-eye lens attached to an electronic still camera was used to capture this image of NASA astronaut Michael Fincke (top center) during the mission’s fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continued on the International Space Station. Photo #1 by NASA

Endeavours final spacewalk - A bright sun, a portion of the International Space Station and Earth's horizon

A bright sun, a portion of the International Space Station and Earth’s horizon are featured in this image photographed by a spacewalker during the STS-134 mission. Photo #2 by NASA

NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff during the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station

May 27, last day for Endeavour spacewalkers, NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff continued to work on the International Space Station. Photo #3 by NASA

Endeavour - May 27 International Space Station and the docked space shuttle Endeavour

May 27: A portion of the International Space Station and the docked space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by a spacewalker, using a fish-eye lens attached to an electronic still camera, during the STS-134 mission’s fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon provide the backdrop for the scene. Photo #4 by NASA

May 27 Endeavor STS-134 mission

NASA astronaut Michael Fincke is working on the ISS, May 27, 2011. Photo #5 by NASA

Andrew Feustel (right) and Greg Chamitoff, both STS-134 mission specialists, participate in the   mission's first session of extravehicular activity

May 20: NASA astronauts Andrew Feustel (right) and Greg Chamitoff, both STS-134 mission specialists, participate in the mission’s first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Feustel and Chamitoff retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station’s rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.. Photo #6 by NASA

May 20 NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission

This is NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, part of STS-134 mission, taken on May 20, 2011 . Photo #7 by NASA

mAY 27 newly-attached 50-foot-long Enhanced International Space Station Boom Assembly (left) is featured in this image photographed by a spacewalker

MAY 27: newly-attached 50-foot-long Enhanced International Space Station Boom Assembly (left) is featured in this image photographed by a spacewalker during the STS-134 mission’s fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Photo #8 by NASA

NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel Day 5 - May 20

Flight Day 5: May 20, 2011. NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel during the 6-hour, 19-minute spacewalk. Photo #9 by NASA

NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel is pictured during the STS-134 mission's third spacewalk

May 25: NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel is pictured during the STS-134 mission’s third spacewalk. Photo #10 by NASA

Day 6 docked space shuttle Endeavour

May 21, 2011: Docked space shuttle Endeavour, photographed by an STS-134 crew member onboard the International Space Station during Flight Day 6 activities. Photo #11 by NASA

Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings

Intersecting the thin line of Earth’s atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings. Photo #12 by NASA

Chamitoff and Fincke completed the primary objectives for the spacewalk

May 27: NASA astronauts Greg Chamitoff (right) and Michael Fincke, both STS-134 mission specialists, completed the primary objectives for the spacewalk. Photo #13 by NASA

May 27 ISS and the docked space shuttle Endeavour

May 27: A portion of the International Space Station and the docked space shuttle Endeavour are featured in this image photographed by a spacewalker, during the STS-134 mission. Photo #14 by NASA

Astronaut Greg Chamitoff Completes the Mission's First EVA

Flight Day 5: NASA Astronaut Greg Chamitoff completes the mission’s first EVA on May 20, 2011. Photo #15 by NASA

With his Extravehicular Mobility Unit spacesuit backdropped against the blackness of space, NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel is pictured during the STS-134 mission's third spacewalk

May 25: With his Extravehicular Mobility Unit spacesuit backdropped against the blackness of space, NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel is pictured during the STS-134 mission’s third spacewalk. Photo #16 by NASA

Day 5 STS-134 Endeavour with Earth in background May 20

Flight Day 5 STS-134 Endeavour with Earth in background, taken on May 20, 2011. Photo #17 by NASA

Space, Horizon, Endeavour

Space, Horizon, Endeavour. Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth’s horizon, Space Shuttle Endeavour, docked to the Pressurized Mating Adapter on the International Space Station, is featured in this photograph taken during the mission’s first planned spacewalk. Photo #18 by NASA

Endeavour STS-134 Spacewalkers waving

With components of the International Space Station in the view, NASA Endeavour astronauts Andrew Feustel (left) and Michael Fincke are pictured waving during the STS-134 mission’s third spacewalk. Photo #19 by NASA

STS-134 Docked at the International Space Station

May 20, 2011: The starboard truss of the International Space Station is featured in this image photographed by an STS-134 crew member while space shuttle Endeavour remains docked with the station. The newly-installed Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS) is visible at center left. The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon provide the backdrop for the scene. STS-134 Docked at the International Space Station. Photo #20 by NASA

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 is transferred from space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay for installation on the station's starboard truss, on May 19, 2011

May 19, 2011: The space shuttle Endeavour docked with the International Space Station as the space station’s robotic arm transfers the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 from the shuttle for installation on the ISS. Photo #21 by NASA

NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, waving May 20

NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, waving on May 20. Photo #22 by NASA

A look into the helmet visor of this astronaut on a spacewalk reveals the easily recognizable smiling countenance of NASA astronaut Michael Fincke

May 25, 2011: A look into the helmet visor of this astronaut on a spacewalk reveals the easily recognizable smiling countenance of NASA astronaut Michael Fincke. Photo #23 by NASA

Shuttle Endeavour docked to the ISS, backdropped by a thinly lit part of Earth's atmosphere and the blackness of orbital nighttime in space

May 21, 2011. Flight Day 6: Docked space shuttle Endeavour docked to the ISS, backdropped by a thinly lit part of Earth’s atmosphere and the blackness of orbital nighttime in space. Photo #24 by NASA

Endeavour - While prepping for May 20 space walk

May 19: Backdropped against a scene showing part of Italy, this image featuring an aft section of the space shuttle Endeavour in the foreground was photographed by an Expedition 27 crew member aboard the International Space Station while the two spacecraft were docked. The vertical stabilizer, the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods and the lower part of the port wing are seen. Twelve astronauts and cosmonauts were busy aboard the joint complex, moving hardware and preparing for a May 20 space walk. Photo #25 by NASA

Gregory Chamitoff makes his way back to the hatch at the end the mission's first spacewalk at the ISS

NASA astronaut Gregory Chamitoff makes his way back to the hatch at the end the mission’s first spacewalk at the International Space Station on Friday May 20, 2011. Nearly five hours into the six-hour spacewalk, mission controllers noticed that Chamitoff’s carbon dioxide sensor wasn’t working. The spacewalk was shortened by 11 minutes from what had been planned. This was the first spacewalk for Gregory Chamitoff. He said it was “a dream come true for me.” Photo #26 by NASA

Astronaut Andrew Feustel reenters the space station after completing n 8-hour, 7-minute spacewalk

Spacewalker NASA Astronaut Andrew Feustel reenters the space station after completing n 8-hour, 7-minute spacewalk on May 22, 2011. He and fellow spacewalker Mike Fincke completed this, the second of the four STS-134 spacewalks, for a mission total of 14 hours 26 minutes. It was the 246th spacewalk conducted by U.S. astronauts, the 116th from space station airlocks, and the 157th in support of space station assembly and maintenance. It was Feustel’s fifth spacewalk and Fincke’s seventh spacewalk. Photo #27 by NASA

May 25 With various components of the ISS in the view, NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel

May 25, 2011: NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel is seen working while various components of the ISS are in view. Photo #28 by NASA

May 25 NASA astronauts Andrew Feustel (left) and Michael Fincke during STS-134

May 25. NASA Endeavour spacewalkers Andrew Feustel (left) and Michael Fincke during STS-134. Photo #29 by NASA

ISS Solar Array panels and a blue and white part of Earth

Flight Day 6. May 21, 2011, ISS Solar Array panels and a blue and white Earth photographed by an STS-134 crew member on board the ISS. Photo #30 by NASA

Endeavour Nose - Coming in to dock at ISS

Flight Day 3: The nose, the forward underside and crew cabin of the space shuttle Endeavour approach first as the STS-134 vehicle prepares to dock with the ISS on May 18, 2011. An Expedition 27 crew member took this photo at a distance of about 600 feet (180 meters). Photo #31 by NASA

May 20 Day 5 NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel ingresses the airlock hatch on the ISS

May 20, Flight Day 5: NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel ingresses the airlock hatch on the ISS at the completion of the STS-134 mission’s first of four space walks. Photo #32 by NASA

The docked space shuttle Endeavour is visible at left. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene

On May 27, 2011, the docked space shuttle Endeavour is visible at left. The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon provide the backdrop for the scene. Photo #33 by NASA

May 20 NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 - Endeavor - ISS

May 20, 2011: NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 – Endeavor – ISS. Photo #34 by NASA

May 20 astronauts Andrew Feustel and Greg Chamitoff work on ISS

May 20, 2011: Astronauts Andrew Feustel and Greg Chamitoff work on the ISS. During the 6-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Feustel and Chamitoff retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station’s rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system. Photo #35 by NASA

May 22 NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, participates in the mission's 2nd session of EVA as construction and maintenance continue on the ISS

May 22, 2011: NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s 2nd session of EVA as construction and maintenance continue on the ISS. During the 8-hour, 7-minute spacewalk, Feustel and astronaut Michael Fincke (out of frame), mission specialist, completed all planned tasks, including refilling one of the station’s cooling loops with ammonia and lubricating one of the station’s massive solar alpha rotary joints. Photo #36 by NASA

May 20 STS-134 Endeavor

May 20: STS-134 Endeavor. NASA astronauts Andrew Feustel and Greg Chamitoff (out of frame), both STS-134 mission specialists, participate in the mission’s first session of extravehicular activity. During the 6-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Feustel and Chamitoff worked hard. Photo #37 by NASA

A portion of the docked space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an STS-134 crew member from a Cupola window of the ISS

Flight Day 8: May 23, 2011 – A portion of the docked space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an STS-134 crew member from a Cupola window of the ISS. Photo #38 by NASA

Endeavour Approaches ISS - DAY 3

Endeavour Approaches ISS – Flight Day 3. From onboard the ISS, Astronaut Ron Garan tweeted, “#Endeavour after doing a “flip” prior to today’s docking. Great 2 have #STS134 crew on board! #FromSpace #NASA,” on May 18, 2011. Photo #39 and tweet by @Astro_Ron / Astronaut Ron Garan

Endeavour's Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

Endeavour’s Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver. On May 18, 2011, Endeavour began the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or ‘backflip,’ on its last visit to the Inernational Space Station. With Commander Mark Kelly at the controls, Endeavour rotated 360 degrees backward to enable space station astronauts Dmitry Kondratyev, Paolo Nespoli and Cady Coleman to take high resolution pictures of the shuttle’s heat shield. Kelly then flew the shuttle through a quarter circle to a position about 400 feet directly in front of the station. Docking occurred about an hour later at 6:14 a.m. Photo #40 by NASA

distant space shuttle Endeavour, appearing somewhat incidentally camouflaged by the white clouds

One of the Expedition 27 crew members aboard the ISS recorded this image of the space shuttle Endeavour as the two spacecraft made their relative approach on May 18. Each spacecraft was occupied by six crew members until the STS-134 astronauts entered the ISS minutes after the docking. Photo #41 by NASA

May 18 Endeavor nose and crew cabin during a survey of the approaching STS-134 vehicle prior to docking with ISS

May 18, 2011: Endeavor nose and crew cabin during a survey of the approaching STS-134 vehicle prior to docking with ISS. Photo #42 by NASA

May 19 space shuttle Endeavour

Backdropped against a scene showing part of Italy, this image featuring the aft part of the space shuttle Endeavour in the foreground was photographed by an Expedition 27 crew member aboard the International Space Station while the two spacecraft were docked. The vertical stabilizer, the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods and the lower part of the port wing are seen. Twelve astronauts and cosmonauts were busy aboard the joint complex, moving hardware and preparing for a May 20 space walk. Photo #43 by NASA

last time Endeavor's wing will be seen in space

Photographed from the ISS during the shuttle’s approach, this was the last time Endeavor’s wing will be seen headed toward space. Photo #44 by NASA

Legacy of Endeavour

Riding atop a crawler-transporter attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters, this was Endeavour’s last-ever scheduled 3.4-mile trek to the pad, known as “rollout.” It took just less than eight hours. We’ll never this again. Bathed in xenon lights, space shuttle Endeavour moved along the crawlerway from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo #45 by NASA/Terry Zaperac

Last time Endeavour will ever be at the Pad

We’ll never see this again in other than photos, for this was the last time Endeavour will ever be at the launch pad. Photo #46 by NASA/Bill Ingalls

88 thoughts on “46 Fabulous Photos of Endeavour’s Last Ever Spacewalk

  1. Excellent Pics. Hard to believe that people are working there day and night for the joy of exploration. Loads of thanks for making these pictures available. I will be using them in my presenation during Science class.

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  10. How come there aren’t any stars visible in the background? The background is always pitch black… Just curious….:)

  11. The master abilities once controlled by the US are now just ancient thoughts and ideas. We can still catch a ride to the ISS from other countries, but the US will no longer be the ‘King’ of the plan.

  12. Geri bildirim: Science, Nature & Ecology | Pearltrees

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