Psychedelic Pow Wow Party: Happy Thanksgiving! [50 PICS]

Happy Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving! Once upon a time, long before white settlers came to the New World, Native Americans had many celebrations to honor the seasons such as Harvest Time in the fall. We don’t hear about that much, instead the focus is on Thanksgiving. We do hear about pow wows which honor the old Native American ways, yet are social events that both Native Americans and non-Native Americans attend to dance, to sing, and to honor culture and a rich heritage. Since we’ve done a trio of Navajo Nation tributes, we thought a Thanksgiving Pow Wow might be a cool way to celebrate. Photo #1 ‘The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth’ (1914) by Jennie A. Brownscombe” & #2 The First Thanksgiving Oil on canvas By Jean Leon Gerome Ferris & #3 by R.A. Whiteside

National PowWow elders

According to PowWows, “There are several different stories of how the powwow was started. Some believe that the War dance Societies of the Ponca and other Southern Plains Tribes were the origin of the powwow. Another belief is that when the Native American tribes were forced onto reservations the government also forced them to have dances for the public to come and see. Before each dance they were lead through the town in a parade, which is the beginning of the Grand Entry.” The photos above are from a National Pow Wow. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #4 by Walter Larrimore & #5 by Katherine Fogden

2002 National Powwow

Dancing, singing and drums have long been an important part of the Native American way of life. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #6 by R.A. Whiteside

Adorable boys at National PowWow

Pow wows are large social gatherings with traditional dances passed on by ancestors but have evolved to include contemporary aspects. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #7 by Ken Rahaim & #8 by Walter Larrimore

Seafair Pow Wow in Seattle's Discovery Park

Seafair Pow Wow in Seattle’s Discovery Park. The ladies’ Fancy Shawl dance is graceful and energetic. Photo #9 by sea turtle

Des Moines area hosts the 'White Eagle Multicultural Pow Wow'

‘Mickey Never Looked So Good.’ The photographer explained, “Every year since 2000, the Des Moines area hosts the ‘White Eagle Multicultural Pow Wow’. It’s held in memory of Ralph Moisa (aka White Eagle), a young Native American who lost his life in 1995 while rescuing a Red Tail Hawk. The Pow Wow was held at Antique Acres near Waukee, Iowa.” Photo #10 by Jason Mrachina

Dancing at National Pow Wow

Dancing at National Pow Wow, dancers are dressed in full regalia to compete in several dance categories. These include Men and Women’s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men’s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women’s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). National Museum of the American Indian Photo #11 Photographer Ken Rahaim & #12 Photographer Ken Rahaim

Native American 2002 National Pow Wow

From the Native American 2002 National Pow Wow, a stunning example of Eastern Style Men’s Traditional. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #13 by R.A. Whiteside

Adorable little girl at National PowWow

This adorable little girl, like all dancers at a Pow Wow, dance to a “Drum” beat and the singing of traditional songs. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #14 by Ken Rahaim

Warrior Dancer in full dress POW WOW NY

Warrior Dancer in full dress at NY Pow Wow. Photo #15 by Andrew Brannan

2007 National Powwow

Planning for pow wows can start as far as a year in advance. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #16 by Ken Rahaim

A Native American at the Indian Summer festival, Henry Maier Festival Park, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

A Native American at the Indian Summer festival, Henry Maier Festival Park, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo #17 by Dori

Pow wow Dancing

Types of pow wow dancing may vary between male, female and children. Photo #18 by Stewart Ho

2007 National Powwow

Some types of dancing include: Straight Dancing, Cloth Dancing, Fancy Shawl Dancing, Buckskin Dancing, Fancy Feather Dancing, Grass Dancing, Northern Traditional Dancing, Gourd Dancing and Jingle Dancing. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #19 by Ken Rahaim

Native American 2007 National Pow Wow

At a pow wow, some of the dances include carrying objects like a dance stick, a ‘wing fan’ or pipe bag. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #20 by Walter Larrimore & #21 by Ken Rahaim

Amazing Headdress B&W Shinecock Nation Pow-Wow

This amazing head dress was see at the Shinecock Nation Pow-Wow, South Hampton. Photo #22 by Andrew Brannan

Greg Red Elk; Dakota Sioux - Pow Wow 2009 at Arizona State University West Campus, with the theme ‘A Celebration of Native Veterans'

Greg Red Elk; Dakota Sioux – Pow Wow 2009 at Arizona State University West Campus, with the theme ‘A Celebration of Native Veterans’. Photo #25 by Caleb Alvarado

Spinning White Eagle Multicultural Pow Wow

Spinning White Eagle Multicultural Pow Wow. Photo #28 by Jason Mrachina

Tiny Tots at Pow Wows

Tiny Tots Jingle Dress dancers at the Spokane Pow Wow; Alabama Coushatta pow wow culture. Photo #29 by BLW & #30 by Jordan Wade

Fancy Dancers Nansemond Tribe Sulfolk Virginia

Fancy Dancers Nansemond Tribe Pow Wow at Sulfolk, Virginia. Photo #31 by Tony Alter

'2 Braves dancing at the Stanford Pow Wow'

‘2 Braves dancing at the Stanford Pow Wow’. Photo #33 by Elliot Margolies

Hoop Dancers are featured at some Pow Wows

Hoop Dancers are featured at some Pow Wows. The hoop has no beginning or end; it represents the continuity of the spirits of all living things. Photo #34 by PDPhoto.org

National 2005  Powwow

A pow wow begins with a Grand Entry. Everyone stands as veterans carry flags into the arena. The flags carried may include the U.S. Flag, Tribal Flags, the POW Flag, and Eagle Staffs of various Native Nations present. After the veterans come the Tribal Chiefs, Princesses, Elders, pow wow organizers, men dancers, followed by the women dancers. National Museum of the American IndianPhoto #37 by Walter Larrimore

Colorful Warrior Shinnecock Nation Pow Wow

Colorful Warrior Shinnecock Nation Pow Wow. Photo #38 by Andrew Brannan

'Seafair Indian Days Pow Wow'

‘Seafair Indian Days Pow Wow’. Photo #39 by sea turtle

beautiful at pow wow

This post is dedicated to my great-grandmother who hailed from the Cherokee Nation and her many stories. As well as for a great-great-grandfather who I didn’t know from a Mohawk tribe. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #40 by Cynthia Frankenburg & #41 by Cynthia Frankenburg

Pow Wow Sycuan Native American San Diego

Pow Wow Sycuan Native American at San Diego. Photo #42 by Bisayan lady

National Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans

Like any social function, there are rules of etiquette at pow wows. One is: Dance as long and as hard as you can. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #43 by Cynthia Frankenburg

Pow Wow drum contest

The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #46 by Walter Larrimore

Native Americans at National Pow Wow

Grand Entry at National Pow Wow sponsored by the Museum of the American Indian. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #47 by R.A. Whiteside

The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer's every movement

The drum groups are the heart of all pow wows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer’s every movement. National Museum of the American Indian Photo #49 by Walter Larrimore

Warrior Dancer in Full Dress at NY Pow Wow

Warrior Dancer in Full Dress at NY Pow Wow. Photo #50 by Andrew Brannan

10 thoughts on “Psychedelic Pow Wow Party: Happy Thanksgiving! [50 PICS]

  1. Your pictures are very fascinating. I’ve always been interested in Native American history, and try and gather as much as I can whenever I speak with one. I live in Michigan, which has a thriving Native American community. Very well done!

  2. Geri bildirim: Psychedelic Pow Wow Party: Happy Thanksgiving! [PICS] « Anacristina79's Blog

  3. These pictures are great and I enjoyed them all. I have only been to one pow-wow but would love to go again soon. I love the costumes and the dancing especially. My grandma on my dad’s side was Indian.

  4. Geri bildirim: 11. Eyecandy: Festivals « Tikkunista!

  5. Please all, do not call them costumes. Costumes are for halloween. The outfits are called either “outfits” or “regalia”.

  6. Geri bildirim: The beauty of diversity

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